Haskell’s “The Forest Unseen” wins best book award from National Academies

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The National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine announced today the recipients of the 2013 Communication Awards. Biology Professor David Haskell’s The Forest Unseen won the award for best science book published in 2012.

Supported by the W.M. Keck Foundation as part of the Keck Futures Initiative, these prestigious annual awards recognize excellence in reporting and communicating science, engineering, and medicine to the general public. Haskell and other winners will be honored during a ceremony in October in Washington, D.C. 

Haskell’s book was chosen "…for his exquisite portrait of nature's universe, drawn from one tiny patch of forest."

"We had a wide range of outstanding nominees from which to choose," said May Berenbaum, chair of the 11-member communication awards selection committee and head of entomology at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. "The winners are excellent examples of science communication that can inform and engage the public."

Other winners were named in the categories of film/radio/TV, magazine/newspaper, and online reporting.

The Keck Futures Initiative was created in 2003 to encourage interdisciplinary research and is funded by a 15-year, $40 million grant from the W.M. Keck Foundation.

The National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council make up the National Academies. They are private, nonprofit institutions that provide science, technology, and health policy advice under a congressional charter.

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