Sewanee Goes Live on Internet2

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Sewanee went live with its new Internet2 connection Feb. 11. The University was awarded an $180,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to fund the school’s connection to Internet2, and one of just four liberal arts colleges in the nation to be awarded such a grant from the NSF. Internet2 is a private network that is composed primarily of educational institutions, but also includes organizations like museums and governmental agencies. Since Internet2 does not allow dot-com users, it is very fast and it allows institutions to share much greater amounts of data and many types of information over the network. Todd Kelley, associate provost for information technology services and principal author of the grant proposal, said that he has already met with a number of Sewanee faculty members who are interested in using Internet2 to enhance their teaching and research. “Disciplines from many areas are represented,” said Kelley, “including social sciences, the humanities, science, and the arts. In fact, I think that one of the most potentially interesting applications for this technology may be by the music department. I am aware, for instance, of a school that has used Internet2 to teach trombone master classes. The bandwidth is so high that the sound and video are transmitted as if you are there in the classroom.” Other schools, like the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, use it to teach students around the world in real-time, he said. Kelley also said that the University is working to form relationships with other organizations that are already using Internet2 in order to enhance Sewanee’s use of the network. “We’re finding that there are all sorts of applications for this,” said Kelley. Kelley credits wide participation in the effort for success in obtaining the NSF funding. The NSF co-investigators on the project are Karen Kuers, associate professor of forestry and geology, John Palisano, professor of biology, and Frank Hart, professor of physics.

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